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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
permanent normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia
in support today of this rule and h.r. 6156, to grant permanent normal trade relations to russia. . this important legislation is a small step towards a big reward. without it the united states exporters and service providers will continue to lose business to our foreign competitors that have already have trade relations -- relationships with russia. and once we lose those markets, our competitors will only become stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories.
a historic arms control agreement with russia which has reduced the number of nuclear weapons that are actively deployed, and he has rebalanced and refocused american foreign policy to the most important region of the world, the asia pacific region. on the whole i would have to give him a very high marks. >> i see. how would you assess romney's approach to foreign policy? >> well, that's a good question. it is not clear what will be romney's approach to foreign policy because i think there are two romneys. there is the hawkish romney who seems to be wanting to pursue a policy that considers certain states as enemies, where military action may be seriously contemplated and he has referred to nuclear iran and syria, russia, as a big adversaries and then there is the other romney that we saw in the presidential debate and this romney was a romney that was much more moderate, realistic, and a presidential candidate who used the word peace so many times and much more than president obama. so we will know until he takes office who will not true romney in terms of foreign policy. >>
always spoke of russia in negative terms. of course i did not like that. that is why i was rooting for obama to win. >> obama always said he did not want another cold war, and that is a huge positive for the relationship between the u.s. and russia. the reaction from the kremlin was less enthusiastic. after putin was reelected, several meetings were scheduled and then canceled until he finally met with obama this summer. moscow was struggling to maintain its status as a world power, and that has made for confrontation with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for internation
between germany and russia by some measures is at its worst in decades. has there been a real break down between russia and the west as pew ten has come back into office? >> i don't believe there's been a break down. i think the perception of russia has been difficult from western investors. when you see human rights case come up, people get a bit more nervous. but general employeeliemployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f st
to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the president. that's the message from allies. that's the message from the international community. that's the message from the europeans. that's the message from the egyptians. and even though our own president is traveling abroad in asia, that's the word from the mouth of our own president. ever
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
because we cannot supply them with natural gas. instead of russia. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurric
would win. there is a growing feeling in russia that the relationship between russia and the united states, since the end of the cold war, is developing according to certain cycles. it is a style of relationship that will be repeated over time. of course, the person matters. it will be easier to deal with obama, but i do not think the we can extract some profound change. even if mitt romney won, it would not be such a big difference. >> right, the key issue was the head of many of the imminent issues. like syria. >> yes, syria. syria, most likely will continue to be a central relationship. but this is a current affair that will likely be settled in another way. the problem is that we do not have any new agenda with the united states, we are still digesting the remnants of the cold war. >> sorry that we cannot speak longer. it was good to get your perspective. thank you. much more reaction coming through all the time, that is it from washington, d.c. for now. we have had an extraordinary night, let's remind ourselves of the highlights of this u.s. presidents election. >> i just calle
that russia is worried it stalled on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we can now supplied them with natural gas instead of russia being a bear sole supplier. subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we fought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reductions. and therefore that if we reduce emissions perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming or not but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so we are not going to have any effect on global temperatures and in the first chapter of the book i talk about geo engineering solutions that no prize-winning scientist paul krugman things can reduce global temperatures if we do it on our own such as breaking clouds with salt water or painting room for white to reflect the sun's rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion we're spending on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy, where raising elec
cheap that chemical manufacturers are attracted back to america. it's so cheap that russia is worried his hold on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we cannot supply them at natural gas in southern russia at the initial supply. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pus
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
unlike 55 other countries where labeling is mandatory. russia and china has mandatory labeling which gives people a choice to know what is in their food. they are distinct distinct while there has been no independent science other than by the patent owners, the chemical companies that own these patents the average citizen has no clue if we're eating this stuff or what the long term effects will be. while they're searching citizens have a right to decide. all of europe, india, japan russia etc. >> eliot: it's terrifying that russia and china are ahead of us in terms of consumer disclosure. let us know if there is gmo in our food. what are the health effects of this genetically modified stuff. what is the science on that? how much data do we have that we can rely upon, we can't rely upon those who are marketing their own products. >> that is exactly the problem. the patent holders for these genetically modified crops they own these crops as i say they've been patented as uniquely theirs. the u.s. government does not require independent safety analysis for these crops to be approved. as
. not to cross it, because that might bring china into the war. not to do anything to aggravate russia. russia was greedy for any colonies, anything it could grab. and i am not going to give you the atom bomb. you are not going to be able to use it. three things he was told. macarthur said, do not worry, the chinese are not coming in. he got our army up to the 38th parallel. a decision was made. the white house knew -- they decided to cross the parallel to get into north korea and destroy the north korean army. this was an agreed upon decision. we did indeed push back the north koreans. but it triggered the chinese, who came rushing in, hundreds of thousands, truman said, i was promised they would not come in. intelligence told macarthur this would not happen. here we are, fighting hundreds of thousands of chinese. they pushed us all the way back. >> back to seoul? >> beyond. they took seoul back. macarthur started to give press conferences. he asked for the use of the bomb. truman said now. truman did not think -- instead of calling macarthur back, he decided to fly to wake island. he sat wit
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
russia -- what kind of policy she needed to have with russia. >> but rula, let's be fair. sarah palin could see russia from her back yard. i mean -- >> and that's -- >> but he says susan rice doesn't know that much. >> he's the man that picked that woman. you know what? he should reflect -- mccain should reflect about how you should behave when you actually are beaten and defeated. with dignity. and you should actually question yourself about your mistakes, about your choices, and how the country wants you to behave from now on. the country chose barack obama with a large margin. >> twice. >> twice. not once. twice. and maz a message for him, that he needs to actually cooperate with barack obama, not attack him. >> joan, as i said, he questioned what ms. rice, ambassador rice knows. let me explain. ambassador rice, now the u.n. ambassador to the u.n., foreign policy adviser to john kerry, clinton administration '93 to 2001, a rhodes scholar, a ph.d. from oxford university. i mean, as was stated by rula, he didn't question condoleezza rice in 2005, when the whole world was questioning
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
say that would be one example of one of the smaller markets. of course the bricks, brazil, russia, india, china are still very much in our radar scope but if you look at some of the medium and smaller sized companies and countries you will see companies in thailand and thailand as a country very interesting. >> a lot of western technology firms build for instance disk drives in thailand. when thai experienced severe flooding those western companies got hit. what is attractive about thailand for long-term investors? >> it's mainly political to begin with. as you know they went through a lot of political turmoil. you had the red shirts, the yellow shirts, fighting on the streets of bangkok and so forth but they have a fufl foundation for political stability which is very good. and also they have a very diversified economy. >> we'll continue talking with mark mobius tomorrow, china's communist party selects a new set of leaders this week. we will talk about how this change in power could impact china's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvi
. the syrian conflict. russia. this is 45 minutes. i thought i would start here. there has been a lot of conversation in this room about the transition and this country. this is happening in china. tell us a little bit about what you think this transition will bring. well of bring substantial change to china? stability or instability? >> it will bring both. let me explain. and we tend to look at transitions in the united states. people come in. they have to lie to keep orders. they have insurance. they were made to execute. this is not how transitions are working. the power is much less than that from the president of the united states. he has to govern with the consensus of the standing committee. we can judge what the problem is. he is the chairman of the board. he is the most powerful person. he had to form coalitions within the system. the manner of execution brought the country is not necessarily through the first task. each generation of leaders have reflected a certain experience that the revolutionary. they recognize that it had to be, it needed to be reformed. they have the a
ride. they are working on a new two men bobsled to bring it to the games and sochi russia. this has been in the works for about one year, a prototype of already been delivered and the west team thinks it could be a major boost for their medal hopes. the women won in 2002, but the two men gold medal has not been won by the americans since 1936. this is a big deal. they are hoping to win a. they are hoping bmw can help. there are specific rules on how you can build them. but bmw believes there bobsled could be the winner that could help the united states team win the gold which they have not done in the two men and more than 50 years. we are looking forward to this which will be in park city utah and in two years with could see this for the olympic team and russia. back to you. >> thank you. it is 5:27. call outside. the news continues at 5:30. >> still ahead, maryland voters approved gambling in the state. john gonzalez live >> live and in hd. this is "good morning washington." on your side. >> lawmakers expected to speak about what the fbi and cia know about the david petraeus scan
. this is 19th century russia. russia. it's love story. it's great story but what the director has done is he is telling it like a stage play. the majority of the film is shot on an actual stage so. when you are watching it and we have this cool clip here, i'll show you shortly. it is shot just like -- you have the video. look at the camera there. watch the set pieces being moved into frame. that is actually how the movie looks in front of the camera. there are people just moving set pieces and then here comes jude law. he will sit down at that table. >> do you like that? >> it is distracting. >> to quote a song, it's beautiful disaster it is a film that looks gorgeous but it takes away from the story. you focus too much on the process as opposed to engaging in the performance. i think it's film you can watch visually but i had a hard time connecting to the characters. i think it's good matinee with a lot of oscar buzz for it right now. >> that is what i was wondering. >> jude law is fantastic if the film. i feel like the movie could have been less focused on the process and more focused on t
by china, russia and iran that would give the united nations control over the internet. we'll see what this week's u.n. vote could mean for your usage of the net here in america. >>> and a victim of superstorm sandy who got a personal promise from the president, now speaking out and calling the president's trip to new jersey, a big waste of time. >>> as we await the white house press briefing the senate bracing itself for possible confirmation hearings on u.s. ambassador susan rice to replace hillary clinton as secretary of state. the buzz on this is growing but could the benghazi debacle sink her chances and should it? we'll have a fair and balanced debate on that next. >> i think if he does, it could be, that kind of arrogance which is what i think it would be could be his undoing, because if she is put under oath and forced to go through and answer all these questions about benghazi i think it will put the administration in a really bad position ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting u
three command-and-control servers. one venezuela, one in russia and when the state senate commands for the virus u.s. intelligence concluded with high degree of confidence that the virus was developed by state-sponsored actors and ask land and not a high degree of confidence, but there is some chatter that they have another target in this virus is not going to stand oil companies. new fact. run a search on here? >> i think so. given "washington post" story says, probably something we have to worry about. [laughter] but now i think the general realization that we have not seen everything yet unfold, second that typical cyberattack activities are probably most crippling and undermining confidence of the public. and so, courses of action addresses of the public and how we'll do this. we haven't gotten a sense to the external oversees implications to the standpoint of other damage up there. i need to know from intelligence community what they know is that date from the ei, have forensics disclosed anything but give us a way to get ahead of the activity and recommended courses of action
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
. it scares me sometimes. >> last time we spoke you said you were investing in russia. you still are? >> i'm looking for investments in russia. i don't have anything there yet. it's not that easy for me to find things in russia. partly because i'm a little lazedy these days. i don't work as hard as i used to. >> oh. okay. >> all right. so -- >> maybe -- >> let's put politics aside. what are you doing? tell me about your portfolio. let's get right down to it. what do you like, what are you long, what are you short? >> i'm, today, tomorrow -- today here, tomorrow there -- i'm going to short more bonds, more u.s. government bonds. i'm going to buy more commodities, buy metals, base metals and precious metals. looks to me like the money printing is going to run amok now. and the spending is going to run amok now. again, larry, i'm not saying this is good for the world, it's not good for anybody. this is what's going to go on. i have to invest based on what's happening, not on what i would like. >> mr. rodgers, rick santelli here. what about europe? i don't disagree with your notion you want to
in russia, dmitry medvedev expressed relief that man who called russia the top geopolitical foe mitt romney did not win the vote. vladimir putin graduated obama it's hard to guess how he really feels. >> kremlin and putin, the presence of russia is not about showing its emotion or putin about showing his. >> he may remember this moment well. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu supported mitt romney said he will continue to work with president obama and says security cooperation between the two countries is rock solid. arab views are mixed. >> i do believe he is well-advised when he comes to the middle east and that is the problem. they don't know how to get up. they don't know how to deal with the -- [ inaudible ] of political and military intervention. >> mixed with the congratulations of world leaders came reminders of the urgent work that needs to be done from stabilizing the global economy and finding revolution to the bloody conflict in syria. certain international initiatives put on hold until november 7. bret? >> bret: amy kell
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
employers and job seekers. >>> a corruption case in russia has brought down a top government official. president vladimir putin has fired the defense minister, anatoly under suspicion for his alleged involvement in a massive fraud case. putin appointed a new defense minister. the president referred to an ongoing probe into alleged fraud at a defense ministry affiliate. he said he decided to fire him to create conditions for an objective investigation into all matters. the case involves the sale of ministry property allegedly at prices far below market value. the transaction resulted in losses of more than $93 million. authorities are questioning of his aides, a female executive, at the affiliate. he became defense minister in 2007. he worked on organization reforms and reduced military personnel, mainly officers. the military criticized him for that. analysts say putin hopes to improve public support for his government by replacing him with the popular shoigu. >>> a group of south korean parents have been charged with obtaining fake foreign passports for their children. they wanted to
the economy. also now we're hearing reaction from world leaders. russia saying it is willing to cooperate with the u.s. as far as washington is willing to go. israel offered muted congratulations. they had strongly supported romney. we're even hearing from the taliban in pakistan saying, you know what, obama and romney are pretty much the same enemy that we'll continue to fight. for obama, only hours after winning his next term, he's getting his first order of overseas business, at least courtesy of british prime minister david cameron who in a tweet today called obama his friend. he was interviewed on the border with jordan and syria and said that they must do something now. he wants balk's help to assist the people of syria to save them from the slaughter he said is going on there, to put more pressure on the assad regime and to help the rebels. lynn? >> now the work begins. michelle, thanks so much. affirmative action. smoking marijuana for pleasure and defining marriage. how did the states vote? >>> plus president obama's vision for america over the next four years and beyond in his o
's re-election will have a positive impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two leaders are divided over how to deal with iran's nuclear ambitions. the u.s. is urging netanyahu not to take military action. palestinian president mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the elite officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who have been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. and the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of
american. my parents fled the holocaust and the czars of russia. we all looked at ourselves as people who needed to understand that we represented struggle in europe and that, as we would see a struggle in america, we would want to identify ourselves with that struggle. so african-americans became a natural brothers in struggle. it was natural to see the struggle for dignity for black people in america as a sister struggle of the jewish struggle. growing up, it was always a part of my breakfast cereal to think of myself as someone who is part of a larger struggle. as i grew up, i had a lot of friends in the african-american community and people close to my family, and one in particular who is in the film. i watched as those young people that i was growing up alongside -- they did not encounter the same possibilities that i did, the same opportunities. we all thought it was the wake of the civil rights movement, i grew up in the early 1970's. it was in the year that it would be a new time for black people and that it would be a great time where the promise will finally be fulfilled. sure,
. it has settled a long-running dispute with its partners in russia, and now it has put to rest the risk of a criminal trial in the united states. >> it's a record settlement. it's hard to say that admission of guilt and a $4.5 billion fine is a good thing for a company, but this could be the beginning of the end of this saga for b.p. >> reporter: b.p. is not done yet. it still faces up to $20 billion in civil fines. a trial in that case is scheduled to begin in february. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: joining us now, mitchell crusto. he's a law professor at loyola university in new orleans, and has been studying the b.p. case and the relationship between business and the environment. how important is today's set element -- settlement. >> this is the biggest story.no. we have more dollars at stake. >> in terms of how importantthil us a little more. it's a record settlement. but it does encompass quite a few different features. in addition to the felony charges there is the fec investigation and the resolution of that matter and that is a big deal. >> darren is saying it's notov
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